Home > Staff > Founding Directors, The Board > Joy Toll
Joy Toll
Current Board Member and Founding Director

Joy Toll OAM (JP) Founding Director  Sydney NSW

Retired from Professional employment.

Majority of employment, until retirement was 23yrs with the Probation & Parole Service NSW, where I established and supervised the ‘Community Service Order Scheme’ in the Sutherland Shire.

Current:

Founding Director of ADHD Australia Limited 2014 –current

Past:

Inaugural committee member of the Playgroup Association of NSW 1974
Founder and current President ADDults with ADHD (NSW) Inc. 1995-2015
Founder and President: Sutherland Shire Zone of the Playgroup Assoc NSW
Joint Committee on Special Education in NSW 1986-1988
Founder and President:Sutherland Shire Learning Difficulties Parent Support Group
Founder and President: Learning Difficulties Coalition of NSW Inc 1988-1995
Memberships/Awards

1988 – ‘Unique Award for Women’, during International Women’s Year 1990 – ‘Order of Australia Medal’ (OAM), during the International Year of Literacy, for services to children with learning disabilities. 1999 – ‘Child Advocacy Award’, Children’s Hospital Education Research Institute (CHERI).

Volunteer:

During 35 years of voluntary advocacy work in the LD/ADHD field, I have represented parents and adults on various government and ministerial committees and panels, including 10 years as the parent representative on the LD consultation panel with the Department of School Education in NSW. More recently, the community representative on the committee to establish the Draft Guidelines, for ADHD in Australia.

Why ADHD Australia?

As a parent and grandparent of children with LD and ADHD, I have lived the experience of fighting for the rights and services of children and adults with LD/ADHD. We have individual support groups and state based organisations who have worked together to bring about localised change. The adult organisation has a national presence, and has revealed huge gaps in services – particularly in rural and outback areas, and inconsistencies in legislation between states. We need a national body to provide a united front with ‘one voice’ if we are to make a difference for those struggling with the many aspects of living with ADHD in Australia. I believe ‘ADHD Australia’ provides that exciting opportunity.